Clicky

Defend free speech and individual liberty online. 

Push back against Big Tech and media gatekeepers.

Seattle Considers Biometric Handprints As a Form of Digital ID For Purchasing Liquor

If you’re tired of censorship and surveillance, join Reclaim The Net.

In what appears to be a major leap toward a surveillance society, the possibility of integrating biometric age verification into the systems of Washington State’s Liquor and Cannabis Board looms ominously, following a recent meeting of regulators. As we grapple with the loss of our privacy in an increasingly digital world, this prospective move triggers a fresh wave of anxieties pertaining to civil liberties, surveillance, and privacy.

The idea of adopting finger and palm print identification for age verification came from an unnamed petitioner whose request was discussed at the July 5th Board meeting, according to Washington State Standard.

The petitioner apparently argues that such a technological upgrade would augment business flexibility and modernize government procedures. There’s also mention of mobile driver’s licenses serving similar purposes in other states and that facial biometrics could potentially conflict with existing state laws. Nevertheless, it’s worth noting that convenience and modernization should never be pursued at the expense of personal privacy and individual freedoms.

A lingering unease arises from the fact that numerous agencies have been collecting biometric data. This growing trend of data collection could potentially confuse and concern residents about how their personal information is being utilized, stored, and protected. A situation such as this could easily lead to widespread mistrust in authorities and unrest amongst citizens who value their privacy.

Although there’s interest among the Board members for a pilot project alongside a liquor and cannabis license holder, the state’s licensing department, which approves driver’s and other licenses, would have to greenlight the experiment. Yet, the mere consideration of such an initiative without a robust and comprehensive discussion about privacy, transparency, and bias policies, raises grave concerns about the nature of data governance in our society.

As of now, there’s no certainty when this proposition will reappear on the Board’s agenda. However, it’s imperative that policymakers tread cautiously in matters of data privacy. The risks associated with biometric data collection, such as potential misuse, data breaches, and erosion of individual privacy rights, warrant immediate attention and meticulous deliberation.

If you’re tired of censorship and surveillance, join Reclaim The Net.

Defend free speech and individual liberty online. 

Push back against Big Tech and media gatekeepers.

Read more

Join the pushback against online censorship, cancel culture, and surveillance.

Already a member? Login.

Share