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“Pick up artist” Addy A-Game and Street Attraction YouTube channels suspended after BBC investigation

Adnan Ahmed, 38, the owner of Addy A-Game was convicted in September for “threatening and abusive” behavior towards young women.
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YouTube channels Addy A-Game and Street Attraction have been suspended on the grounds of violating the platform’s rules with regard to nudity and sexual conduct. The BBC says that it was their investigation into the online industry that exposed the aforementioned “pickup artists,” leading to the termination of their YouTube channels.

The aforementioned channels commonly offered to teach the secrets of picking up women from the streets. BBC’s investigation focused on such online “game” businesses that claimed to teach picking up young women and thereafter post secret recordings of their sexcapdes.

Adnan Ahmed, 38, the owner of Addy A-Game was convicted in September for “threatening and abusive” behavior towards young women. The police had begun investigating Ahmed after BBC revealed his operation through “The Social” earlier this year. As described above, Ahmed had discreetly recorded his interactions with dozens of women in Eastern Europe and Glasgow.

Ahmed, who commonly describes himself as a lifestyle coach and a dating guru, had gone to the extreme lengths of posting the audio from his sexual encounters with women on his YouTube channel; he further expressed that he considered such efforts to be “educational” in nature. The Glasgow Sheriff Court finally ruled against him and found him guilty of five charges

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While Ahmed from Addy A-Game was ruled guilty, the founder of ‘Street Attraction’ Eddie Hitchens, however, told BBC that whatever his company did was “completely consensual.” He further added, “We actually help men… so if anything we help prevent rape culture to help prevent them get involved in anything illegal or non-consensual.”

One of the BBC’s reporters Myles Bonnar went undercover in a bootcamp by Street Attraction where attendees were taught techniques to seduce women, which included tips to overcome the “last minute resistance” as well.

Though Street Attraction claims to be a legitimate online business doing nothing wrong, YouTube doesn’t think so.

The video-sharing platform shut down both the channels Addy A-Game and Street Attraction and said that it “strictly prohibits explicit sexual, graphic, or harassing content. Nothing is more important than protecting the safety of our community, and we will continue to review and refine our policies in this area.”

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